Browsing publications by Kay Mann

Newcastle AuthorsTitleYear
Kay Mann
Dr Mark Pearce
Birthweight and fasting glucose and insulin levels: results from the Aboriginal Birth Cohort Study2013
Kay Mann
Dr Louise Hayes
Dr Laura Basterfield
Professor Louise Parker
Dr Mark Pearce
et al.
Differing lifecourse associations with sport-, occupational- and household-based physical activity at age 49-51 years: the Newcastle Thousand Families Study2013
Dr Kelechi Njoku
Nermine Basta
Kay Mann
Dr Richard McNally
Dr Mark Pearce
et al.
Socioeconomic variation in survival from childhood leukaemia in northern England, 1968–20102013
Dr Ajay Abraham
Dr Mark Pearce
Kay Mann
Emeritus Professor Roger Francis
Dr Fraser Birrell
et al.
Breast is best. Lifecourse influences on the development of knee osteophytes: the Newcastle Thousand Families Study2012
Dr Mark Pearce
Kay Mann
Dr Carmen Martin-Ruiz
Professor Louise Parker
Professor Martin White
et al.
Childhood Growth, IQ and Education as Predictors of White Blood Cell Telomere Length at Age 49-51 Years: The Newcastle Thousand Families Study2012
Dr Mark Pearce
Dr Laura Basterfield
Kay Mann
Dr Kathryn Parkinson
Professor Ashley Adamson
et al.
Early Predictors of Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in 8-10 Year Old Children: The Gateshead Millennium Study2012
Dr Mark Pearce
Kay Mann
Professor Caroline Relton
Emeritus Professor Roger Francis
Professor James Steele CBE
et al.
How the Newcastle Thousand Families birth cohort study has contributed to the understanding of the impact of birth weight and early life socioeconomic position on disease in later life2012
Dr Mark Pearce
Peter Tennant
Kay Mann
Professor Louise Parker
Lifecourse predictors of mammographic density: The Newcastle Thousand Families cohort Study2012
Dr Ajay Abraham
Dr Mark Pearce
Kay Mann
Emeritus Professor Roger Francis
Dr Fraser Birrell
et al.
Lifecourse predictors of ultrasound features of hip osteoarthritis: the newcastle thousand families study2012
Dr Sunil Bhopal
Kay Mann
Dr Mark Pearce
Registration of cancer in girls remains lower than expected in countries with low/middle incomes and low female education rates2012
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