Developing 3D GIS web services

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  2. Kay Cheewinsiriwat
  3. Philip James
  4. Dr Stuart Barr
Author(s)Cheewinsiriwat P, James PM, Barr SL
Editor(s)
Publication type Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)
Conference Name5th International Conference on Geographic Information Systems 2008 (ICGIS 2008)
Conference LocationIstanbul, Turkey
Year of Conference2008
Legacy Date2-5 July 2008
Volume
Pages
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Developments in Geographic Information (GI) systems have been moving towards real three-dimensional (3D) GIS in both visualisation and analysis aspects. However, the focus of much recent research has been on visualisation in 3D. Whilst visualisation provides means of extending 2.5D GIS to the 3D realm, processing 3D data within the GIS environment has received less focus, partly due to the added complexity of required data structures. This paper presents research on a prototypical framework and algorithmic development for a set of commonly used 3D analysis operations such as solid-solid intersection. The framework utilizes web services as the main means of deployment. During the development process, suitable 3D geospatial data representations as well as geometrical computational algorithms for analytical processes were taken into consideration. 3D geospatial objects; geometry and topology, are represented by using the Boundary Representation (B-Rep) technique. After developing the data representation and analysis operations, a use case was implemented to provide accurate flood cost-risk assessment for Towyn in the UK. Building footprints and their attributes were imported into the system and reconstructed as 3D buildings. Each building storey was created as a solid. The terrain surface and a flood water level were used to reconstruct flood body solids. The flood body solids were then used to perform solid-solid intersection with the 3D buildings to generate results indicating the extent of flooding on individual buildings and thus provide a more accurate cost profile. The results, both graphic and non-graphic, can be exported into standard exchange file formats such as shapefiles, or CityGML. Finally, the web services providing data import, data export and analysis functions were combined in a simple web service processing chain to provide on-the-fly 3D analysis.