Prevalence, natural history, and clinical outcome of mild to moderate ventriculomegaly

  1. Lookup NU author(s)
  2. Dr Farah Sethna
  3. Peter Tennant
  4. Professor Judith Rankin
  5. Professor Stephen Robson
Author(s)Sethna F, Tennant PWG, Rankin J, Robson SC
Publication type Article
JournalObstetrics & Gynecology
Year2011
Volume117
Issue4
Pages867-876
ISSN (print)0029-7844
ISSN (electronic)1873-233X
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OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence, associated anomalies, progression and clinical outcome in fetuses diagnosed with mild-moderate ventriculomegaly at 18-24 weeks of pregnancy. METHODS: Prospective population-based study from the North of England. Data were extracted from the UK Northern Congenital Abnormality Survey for cases identified during 1994 to 2008. Additional anomalies present were categorised according to European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) guidelines. Differences between isolated and non-isolated ventriculomegaly were examined by either Fisher's exact test or Mann-Whitney U test. Changes in prevalence were examined by the χ2 test for trend. RESULTS: There were 355 cases of confirmed mild-moderate ventriculomegaly in singleton pregnancies at 18-24 weeks amongst 454,080 registered births, giving a total prevalence of 7.8 per 10,000 registered births (95%CI 7.0-8.7). The minimum rate of chromosomal anomaly and trisomy 21 (including cases karyotyped postnatally) in isolated cases (i.e. where no other structural anomaly was identified prenatally) was 10.2% (95%CI 6.1-16.0) and 4.5% (95%CI 2.0-8.7) respectively. Additional structural anomalies were identified prenatally in 43.1% of cases. Amongst isolated cases, 61.9% (95%CI 53.3-70.0) resolved by the final prenatal scan (the majority by 24 weeks’ gestation) and 10.7% (95%CI 6.4-16.6) were found to have ‘missed’ structural anomalies after birth. The probability of an infant death for isolated ventriculomegaly was 3% (95%CI 0.8-7.6). CONCLUSION: This register based study on mild-moderate ventriculomegaly provides unique epidemiological and outcome data. Information from this study will aid in counselling parents.
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182117471
DOI10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182117471
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