Drawing Connections

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  2. Richard Talbot
Author(s)Talbot R
Editor(s)Steve Garner
Series Editor(s)John Steers
Publication type Book Chapter
Book TitleWriting on Drawing: Essays on Drawing Practice and Research
Series TitleReadings in Art and Design Education
Year2008
Volume
Pages43-57
ISBN9781841502007
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‘Drawing Connections’ The drawings that I make are, in some ways, the result of giving problems to myself to solve. The white space of the paper is also a place in which I can make and draw connections between things and grapple directly with things that are, in more than one sense, out of reach. A remark often made to me by viewers on encountering my drawings for the first time, is that I must be very good at thinking three-dimensionally. On the face of it, this would appear to be the case – I am building elaborate fictitious structures that entail working out how things join, and working out how and where they sit in space. In reality though, as far as being good at thinking three-dimensionally is concerned, I think that the reverse may be closer to the truth. Despite appearances, it does not come naturally - I actually struggle with these things, but I believe that this frustration with three dimensions lies at the root of much of my drawing practice. My involvement with both drawing and sculpture, and my involvement with Linear Perspective - its practice as well as its history and broader cultural implications, are part of this same concern with the problems of understanding and representing three-dimensions.
PublisherIntellect Books
Place PublishedBristol
NotesInvited to write chapter of Book ‘Writing on Drawing’, edited by Steven Garner of the Department of Design and Innovation, Faculty of Technology, The Open University. To be published by INTELLECT, Bristol. Steve Garner comments; ‘The collection of essays will explore what research means for drawing makers, drawing users and drawing investigators today - and might mean in the future. It will offer authoritative comment on the appropriateness of drawing research methods and discuss the value of new knowledge emerging from drawing research today.’
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