Implanted bipolar technology in 4H-SiC

  1. Lookup NU author(s)
  2. Professor Nick Wright
  3. Dr Christopher Johnson
  4. Professor Anthony O'Neill
  5. Dr Alton Horsfall
  6. Dr Sylvie Ortolland
  7. Kazuhiro Adachi
Author(s)Wright NG; Ortolland S; ONeill AG; Horsfall A; Adachi K; Johnson CM; Knights AP; Coleman PG
Editor(s)
Publication type Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)
Conference NameWide-Bandgap Electronic Devices. Symposium (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings)
Conference LocationStrasbourg
Year of Conference2000
Date30 May - 2 June 2000
Volume622
PagesT1-T7
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A simple ion-implanted bipolar transistor technology in 4H-SiC is presented. Suitable for both high-voltage vertical devices and lateral high-temperature transistors (for circuit applications), the technology is based on an implanted boron p-well with nitrogen and boron (or aluminium) implanted n+ and p+ regions respectively. The effects of base doping and carrier lifetime on device performance have been studied using TCAD techniques. It is shown that understanding the strong variation of carrier concentration with temperature (due to deep activation levels) and applied field (so-called field ionization) is critical in device design optimisation. The effects of post-implant anneal conditions on the physical and electrical characteristics of the junctions are investigated. It is shown that annealing can remove much of the damage induced by high dose nitrogen implantation but that residual damage is still present. The electrical characteristics of simple BJT transistors with breakdown voltages in excess of 1000V and common-emitter gains of ~2 are related to the level of such residual damage. (6 References).
PublisherMaterials Research Society
URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1557/PROC-622-T1.7.1
DOI10.1557/PROC-622-T1.7.1
NotesShul RJ Ren F Pletschen W Murakami M 7.1-6. Warrendale, PA, USA. Wide-Bandgap Electronic Devices. Symposium. San Francisco, CA, USA. 24-27 April 2000.