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Analisi dinamica accoppiata della diga Marana Capacciotti

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Gaetano Elia

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Abstract

The dynamic behaviour of the Marana Capacciotti dam, located in Puglia about 13.5 km South-West of Cerignola (Foggia), was studied adopting a fully coupled effective stress approach implemented in a non-commercial finite element code. The mechanical behaviour of the embankment and foundation soils was simulated using a recently developed multi-surface elasto-plastic model. Its calibration was based on available experimental data obtained from laboratory tests on undisturbed samples. In order to define the initial stress state and to calibrate the internal variables of the model, a simplified geological history of the deposit, the dam construction stages and the reservoir impounding were simulated before the application of the earthquake at the bedrock level. In particular, the influence of the initial state on the results of the dynamic analyses was studied adopting two different hypotheses for the dam construction simulation. The seismic stability of the dam was evaluated consistently to the seismic hazard maps specified by the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) for the entire italian territory. Real accelerograms, with average spectra compatible with those proposed by Gruppo di Lavoro MPS [2004] for the considered site, were applied to the bedrock formation. In this paper a critical review of the role of the initial state, the frequency content of the seismic input, its maximum acceleration and the viscous damping artificially added in the simulations is addressed and some general conclusions are proposed.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Amorosi A, Elia G

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Rivista Italiana di Geotecnica

Year: 2008

Issue: 4

Pages: 78-96

Print publication date: 01/01/2008

Date deposited: 13/11/2009

ISSN (print): 0557-1405

Publisher: Patron Editore


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