Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Two alternative models of health behaviour and recovery from activity limitations due to acute injury: A prospective study

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Falko Sniehotta

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

Cognitions influence recovery from activity limitations. In this study we aimed to independently test, compare and combine the common sense self-regulation model (CS-SRM) and social cognitive theory (SCT) in predicting recovery from activity limitations due to acute injury. Measures were gathered at two time points 5-6 weeks apart. The sample consisted of 146 university students (Mean age: 21.86, SD: 4.83, 62% female) with a heterogeneous range of injuries that limited their participation in physical activity. The dependent variable was recovery from activity limitations (Physical Functioning - Short Form-36). The predictor variables were measured using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and SCT items designed according to theoretical recommendations. Time-line (TL) and self-efficacy (SE) were significant predictors of recovery in a multivariate analysis, controlling for reported pain at Time 1. A combined model including the best predictors from both models, TL (β = -0.25, p < 0.05, R2 change = 0.17, p < 0.01) and SE (β =0.31, p < 0.05, R2 change = 0.05, p < 0.05), accounted for a significant amount of the variance in recovery from activity limitations. A combination of key variables from both models may be particularly useful for understanding the cognitive factors that influence recovery from activity limitations.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Molloy GJ, Sniehotta F, Johnston M

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Psychology & Health

Year: 2009

Volume: 24

Issue: 3

Pages: 271-285

ISSN (print): 0887-0446

ISSN (electronic): 1476-8321

Publisher: Routledge

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08870440701684548

DOI: 10.1080/08870440701684548


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share