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Cognitive bias in the chick anxiety-depression model

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Ben Brilot, Professor Melissa Bateson

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Abstract

Cognitive bias is a phenomenon that presents in clinical populations where anxious individuals tend to adopt a more pessimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous aversive stimuli whereas depressed individuals tend to adopt a less optimistic-like interpretation of ambiguous appetitive stimuli. To further validate the chick anxiety-depression model as a neuropsychiatric simulation we sought to quantify this cognitive endophenotype. Chicks exposed to an isolation stressor of 5 m to induce an anxiety-like or 60 m to induce a depressive-like state were then tested in a straight alley maze to a series of morphed ambiguous appetitive (chick silhouette) to aversive (owl silhouette) cues. In non-isolated controls, runway start and goal latencies generally increased as a function of greater amounts of aversive characteristics in the cues. In chicks in the anxiety-like state, runway latencies were increased to aversive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like behavior. In chicks in the depression-like state, runway latencies were increased to both aversive and appetitive ambiguous cues, reflecting more pessimistic-like and less optimistic-like behavior, respectively. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Salmeto AL, Hymel KA, Carpenter EC, Brilot BO, Bateson M, Sufka KJ

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Brain Research

Year: 2011

Volume: 1373

Pages: 124-130

Print publication date: 01/02/2011

ISSN (print): 0006-8993

ISSN (electronic): 1872-6240

Publisher: Elsevier BV

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.007


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