Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

ePrints

Colour-memory-dependent colour constancy: 2D vs 3D real surfaces

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Yazhu Ling, Professor Anya Hurlbert

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

Perceived object colour tends to stay constant under changes in illumination. In the real world, assessing the constancy of object colours typically involves a comparison between the colour we see and the colour we remember; therefore, colour memory must play an important role in the phenomenon of colour constancy. Here we describe two experiments investigating colour memory and colour constancy. Experiment 1 employs 3D domes as stimuli. In this experiment, using an artificial viewing environment with insufficient adaptation, we find a robust dependence of colour constancy on colour memory. This dependence cannot be captured by the most commonly used empirical measure of colour constancy, the Brunswik ratio, which does not incorporate colour memory and does not accurately reflect our findings in this experiment. We therefore develop a new colour constancy index (CCIm) which incorporates colour memory. Calculated in terms of CCIm, the results demonstrate that colour constancy is in fact moderate but imperfect in Experiment 1. Experiment 2 employs 2D natural papers. In this experiment, with longer adaptation time, under real illumination, the obtained CCIm results are all close to 1 (perfect colour constancy), indicating that colour constancy is as good as colour memory allows.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Ling Y, Hurlbert A

Publication type: Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)

Publication status: Published

Conference Name: CGIV 2006 - 3rd European Conference on Colour in Graphics, Imaging, and Vision, Final Program and Proceedings

Year of Conference: 2006

Pages: 291-293

Publisher: Society for Imaging Science and Technology

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 0892082623


Actions

    Link to this publication


Share