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Conch [sound studio]

Lookup NU author(s): Neil Bromwich

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Abstract

The Conch [sound studio] is a mobile architectural caravan sculpture made from larch and ply, made in the shape of a sea shell which houses a solar powered sound system. It is a place for visitors to sit and listen to conversations around the challenge of creating sustainable communities in the future. These conversations have been collected on the Conch's travels to remote communities within the Highlands of Scotland. 'Tuning into the thoughts of communities on the brink of transformation, The Conch (Sound Studio) is a travelling structure - part shell, part ark – gathering people’s hopes and fears for the future, questing for a change in consciousness. Apocalyptic thinking or positivist transformation, the survival strategies of a new world order are whispered from its walls' Eleanor Garty, Sept 2010


Publication metadata

Artist(s): Bromwich N, Walker Z

Publication type: Exhibition

Publication status: Published

Year: 2011

Number of Pieces: 1

Venue: Scottish Highland Tour

Location: Edinburgh Festival, Jupiter Artland, SHE Inverness Housing Expo, Thurso, Scrabster, Findhorn, Culloden, Culloden, Culbokie Black Isle, Nairn

Source Publication Date: August 2010-August 2011

Media of Output: Sculpture, Architectural Structure, Sound

URL: http://www.invernessoldtownart.co.uk/conch.asp

Notes: Originally commissioned for Scotland's first Housing Expo in Aug 2010 by IOTA supported by Highland Council, Creative Scotland and Inverness City Partnership and The Rural Innovation Fund. The work has had a huge impact as the centre piece sculpture for SHE Housing Expo and continued to reach large number through touring the whole north of Scotland. To date the work has been seen by over 41,00 people Since has gone on to tour the highlands in Summer 2011


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