Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Preliteracy intervention - lessons to be learned from seemingly discrepant results

Lookup NU author(s): Professor James Law

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

At face value, promoting early literacy skills is a bit of a “no-brainer.” We all want to maximize the life opportunities for children, and early intervention is immensely appealing for parents, practitioners, and policy-makers alike. Early intervention is increasingly supported by neurobiological evidence for the negative consequences of restricted environments 1 and the economic evidence for the value of early intervention. 2 Yet, knowing that early intervention has been shown to work for one aspect of development at a given age and dosage is not the same as saying that such results will be universally applicable. Indeed, as the 2 studies discussed in this issue of Pediatrics demonstrate, 3, 4 the results of effectiveness studies may seem contradictory; in this case, results of 1 study indicate that a preliteracy intervention does not work, and results of the other study indicate that it does. The research community has the responsibility of teasing these issues apart: how much does it work and for whom?


Publication metadata

Author(s): Law J

Publication type: Editorial

Publication status: Published

Journal: Pediatrics

Year: 2011

Volume: 127

Issue: 3

Pages: 573-574

Print publication date: 01/03/2011

ISSN (print): 0031-4005

ISSN (electronic): 1098-4275

Publisher: American Academy of Pediatrics

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-3605

DOI: 10.1542/peds.2010-3605


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share