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The relative weight of shape and non-rigid motion cues in object perception: A model of the parameters underlying dynamic object discrimination

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Quoc Vuong, Professor Jenny Read

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Abstract

Shape and motion are two dominant cues for object recognition, but it can be difficult to investigate their relative quantitative contribution to the recognition process. In the present study, we combined shape and non-rigid motion morphing to investigate the relative contributions of both types of cues to the discrimination of dynamic objects. In Experiment 1, we validated a novel parameter-based motion morphing technique using a single-part three-dimensional object. We then combined shape morphing with the novel motion morphing technique to pairs of multipart objects to create a joint shape and motion similarity space. In Experiment 2, participants were shown pairs of morphed objects from this space and responded "same" on the basis of motion-only, shape-only, or both cues. Both cue types influenced judgments: When responding to only one cue, the other cue could be ignored, although shape cues were more difficult to ignore. When responding on the basis of both cues, there was an overall bias to weight shape cues more than motion cues. Overall, our results suggest that shape influences discrimination more than motion even when both cue types have been made quantitatively equivalent in terms of their individual discriminability.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Vuong QC, Friedman A, Read JCA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Vision

Year: 2012

Volume: 12

Issue: 3

Print publication date: 01/03/2012

ISSN (electronic): 1534-7362

Publisher: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/12.3.16

DOI: 10.1167/12.3.16


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