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Laboratory screening of potential predators of the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) and assessment of Hypoaspis miles performance under varying biotic and abiotic conditions

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Robert Shiel, Dr Olivier Sparagano, Dr Jonathan Guy

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Abstract

The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), is the most important ectoparasitic pest of layer hens worldwide and difficult to control through 'conventional' synthetic acaricides. The present study aimed to identify a suitable predator of D. gallinae that could potentially form the basis of biological control in commercial poultry systems. From four selected predatory mite species (Hypoaspis miles (Berlese), Hypoaspis aculeifer (Canestrini), Amblyseius degenerans (Berlese) and Phytoseiulus persimilis (Athias-Henriot)). Hypoaspis mites demonstrated the greatest potential as predators of D. gallinae. Experiments were also conducted to assess the effect of environmental (temperature and dust), physical (presence of harbourages) and biological (presence of alternative prey) factors on the predatory efficacy of H. miles. Predation of D. gallinae per se was observed under all conditions tested, though was found to be temperature-dependant and reduced by the presence of alternative prey. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Ali W, George DR, Shiel RS, Sparagano OAE, Guy JH

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Veterinary Parasitology

Year: 2012

Volume: 187

Issue: 1-2

Pages: 341-344

Print publication date: 13/01/2012

ISSN (print): 0304-4017

ISSN (electronic): 1873-2550

Publisher: Elsevier BV

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2012.01.014

DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2012.01.014


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