Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

ePrints

Emergence of pneumococcal 19A empyema in UK children

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Matthew Thomas, Clare Simmister, Dr David Cliff, Dr Mohamed Elemraid, Dr Clark Clark, Professor Stephen Rushton, Dr David Spencer

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

Introduction Invasive pneumococcal disease due to serotype 19A has become a major concern, particularly in the USA and Asia. We describe the characteristics of pneumococcal serotype 19A related empyema and changes in its incidence in the UK. Methods Data from paediatric empyema patients between September 2006 and March 2011 were collected from 17 respiratory centres in the UK. Pneumococcal serotypes were identified as part of the Health Protection Agency enhanced paediatric empyema surveillance programme. Results Four serotypes accounted for over 80% of 136 cases (Serotype 1 : 43%, 3 : 21%, 7 : 11% and 19A: 10%). The incidence of empyema due to serotype 19A quadrupled from 0.48 (0.16-1.13) cases per million children in 2006/2007 to 2.02 (1.25-3.09) in 2010/2011. Severity of disease was significantly increased in children with 19A infection when compared to other serotypes. Conclusions The incidence of empyema due to pneumococcal serotype 19A infection has increased significantly and is associated with substantial morbidity.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Thomas MF, Sheppard CL, Guiver M, Slack MPE, George RC, Gorton R, Paton JY, Simmister C, Cliff D, Elemraid MA, Clark JE, Rushton SP, Spencer DA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Archives of Disease in Childhood

Year: 2012

Volume: 97

Issue: 12

Pages: 1070-1072

Print publication date: 16/10/2012

ISSN (print): 0003-9888

ISSN (electronic): 1468-2044

Publisher: BMJ Group

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2012-301790

DOI: 10.1136/archdischild-2012-301790


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

    Link to this publication


Share