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Paper-based and web-based intervention modeling experiments identified the same predictors of general practitioners' antibiotic-prescribing behavior

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Martin Eccles

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Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the robustness of the intervention modeling experiment (IME) methodology as a way of developing and testing behavioral change interventions before a full-scale trial by replicating an earlier paper-based IME. Study Design and Setting: Web-based questionnaire and clinical scenario study. General practitioners across Scotland were invited to complete the questionnaire and scenarios, which were then used to identify predictors of antibiotic-prescribing behavior. These predictors were compared with the predictors identified in an earlier paper-based IME and used to develop a new intervention. Results: Two hundred seventy general practitioners completed the questionnaires and scenarios. The constructs that predicted simulated behavior and intention were attitude, perceived behavioral control, risk perception/anticipated consequences, and self-efficacy, which match the targets identified in the earlier paper-based ME. The choice of persuasive communication as an intervention in the earlier IME was also confirmed. Additionally, a new intervention, an action plan, was developed. Conclusion: A web-based IME replicated the findings of an earlier paper-based IME, which provides confidence in the 1ME methodology. The interventions will now be evaluated in the next stage of the IME, a web-based randomized controlled trial. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Treweek S, Bonetti D, MacLennan G, Barnett K, Eccles MP, Jones C, Pitts NB, Ricketts IW, Sullivan F, Weal M, Francis JJ

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

Year: 2014

Volume: 67

Issue: 3

Pages: 296-304

Print publication date: 31/12/2013

ISSN (print): 0895-4356

ISSN (electronic): 1878-5921

Publisher: Elsevier

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.09.015

DOI: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2013.09.015


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