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Acute effects of violent video-game playing on blood pressure and appetite perception in normal-weight young men: a randomized controlled trial

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Mario Siervo

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Abstract

Watching television and playing video game being seated represent sedentary behaviours and increase the risk of weight gain and hypertension. We investigated the acute effects of violent and non-violent video-game playing on blood pressure (BP), appetite perception and food preferences. Forty-eight young, normal-weight men (age: 23.1 +/- 1.9 years; body mass index: 22.5 +/- 1.9 kg/m(2)) participated in a three-arm, randomized trial. Subjects played a violent video game, a competitive, non-violent video game or watched TV for 1 h. Measurements of BP, stress and appetite perception were recorded before a standardized meal (similar to 300 kcal) and then repeated every 15 min throughout the intervention. Violent video-game playing was associated with a significant increase in diastolic BP (Delta +/- s.d.= +7.5 +/- 5.8 mm Hg; P=0.04) compared with the other two groups. Subjects playing violent video games felt less full (P=0.02) and reported a tendency towards sweet food consumption. Video games involving violence appear to be associated with significant effects on BP and appetite perceptions compared with non-violent gaming or watching TV.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Siervo M, Sabatini S, Fewtrell MS, Wells JCK

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Year: 2013

Volume: 67

Issue: 12

Pages: 1322-1324

Print publication date: 01/12/2013

Online publication date: 02/10/2013

ISSN (print): 0954-3007

ISSN (electronic): 1476-5640

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2013.180

DOI: 10.1038/ejcn.2013.180


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