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Ultra-wetting graphene-based membrane

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Kamelia Boodhoo

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND).


Abstract

Carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and its derivatives based membranes in real applications are still far from reality due to their hydrophobic nature and limitations in their fabrication process. Here, we have devised a simple and feasible fabrication method to bring the high end nanocarbon based material to real downstream applications. In order to achieve this objective, the wettability of graphene was initially increased to an ultra-wetting level by incorporating amine and carboxyl functionality onto the graphene. The amine and carboxylated graphene is then covalently attached to a polymer matrix to fabricate a water filtration membrane. The characterization of the modified supported graphene-based membrane indicates that significantly higher hydrophilicity than previously expected is achieved, with the water contact angle reduced to zero. The ultra-wetting graphene increases the water permeability of the membrane by 126% without any changes in the selectivity. Based on our findings, we conclude that the ultra-wetting graphene will be an ideal material for new generation water filtration membranes. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Prince JA, Bhuvana S, Anbharasi V, Ayyanar N, Boodhoo KVK, Singh G

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Membrane Science

Year: 2016

Volume: 500

Pages: 76-85

Print publication date: 15/02/2016

Online publication date: 24/11/2015

Acceptance date: 19/11/2015

Date deposited: 31/03/2016

ISSN (print): 0376-7388

ISSN (electronic): 1873-3123

Publisher: Elsevier

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.memsci.2015.11.024

DOI: 10.1016/j.memsci.2015.11.024


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