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Characterizing visual asymmetries in contrast perception using shaded stimuli

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza

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Abstract

Previous research has shown a visual asymmetry in shaded stimuli where the perceived contrast depended on the polarity of their dark and light areas (Chacon, 2004). In particular, circles filled out with a top-dark luminance ramp were perceived with higher contrast than top-light ones although both types of stimuli had the same physical contrast. Here, using shaded stimuli, we conducted four experiments in order to find out if the perceived contrast depends on: (a) the contrast level, (b) the type of shading (continuous vs. discrete) and its degree of perceived three-dimensionality, (c) the orientation of the shading, and (d) the sign of the perceived contrast alterations. In all experiments the observers' tasks were to equate the perceived contrast of two sets of elements (usually shaded with opposite luminance polarity), in order to determine the subjective equality point. Results showed that (a) there is a strong difference in perceived contrast between circles filled out with luminance ramp top-dark and top-light that is similar for different contrast levels; (b) we also found asymmetries in contrast perception with different shaded stimuli, and this asymmetry was not related with the perceived three-dimensionality but with the type of shading, being greater for continuous-shading stimuli; (c) differences in perceived contrast varied with stimulus orientation, showing the maximum difference on vertical axis with a left bias consistent with the bias found in previous studies that used visual-search tasks; and (d) asymmetries are consistent with an attenuation in perceived contrast that is selective for top-light vertically-shaded stimuli.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Chacon J, Castellanos MA, Serrano-Pedraza I

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Vision

Year: 2015

Volume: 15

Issue: 16

Pages: 1-14

Online publication date: 16/12/2015

Acceptance date: 01/01/1900

ISSN (electronic): 1534-7362

Publisher: Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1167/15.16.11

DOI: 10.1167/15.16.11


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