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DOHaD and the Periconceptional Period, a Critical Window in Time

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Miguel Velazquez

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Abstract

Environmental conditions can modulate the developmental program and have enduring consequences on the life cycle, affecting long-term health and disease risk through to adulthood. These effects can occur through different mechanisms and at different stages of development. This chapter considers environmental factors that may occur during the periconceptional period, around the time of conception and during early embryo development, and have lasting effects on phenotype and lifetime health. We review in particular in vivo conditions of maternal dietary nutrition during periconceptional development, both poor and over-rich nutrition, and how such conditions may affect the early embryo, altering subsequent development and postnatal health. In addition, in vitro conditions that embryos may experience, in particular associated with assisted conception technologies, are reviewed. We also evaluate the importance of paternal as well as maternal environment during periconceptional induction of developmental programming. We conclude that the periconceptional environment is one of critical sensitivity for lifetime health and there is a need for continued research within this field to identify mechanisms and devise protective strategies.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Sun C, Velazquez MA, Fleming TP

Editor(s): Cheryl S. Rosenfeld

Publication type: Book Chapter

Publication status: Published

Book Title: The Epigenome and Developmental Origins of Health and Disease

Year: 2016

Pages: 33-47

Online publication date: 23/10/2015

Acceptance date: 30/07/2015

Edition: 1st

Publisher: Elsevier

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-801383-0.00003-7

DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-801383-0.00003-7

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 9780128013830


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