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Sleep problems and hypothalamic dopamine D3 receptor availability in Parkinson disease

Lookup NU author(s): Professor David Brooks, Professor Nicola Pavese

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relationship between hypothalamic D3 dopamine receptor availability and severity of sleep problems in Parkinson disease (PD).Methods: Twelve patients were assessed with PET and the high-affinity dopamine D3 receptor radioligand [C-11]-propyl-hexahydro-naphtho-oxazin ([C-11]-PHNO). Severity of sleep problems was rated with appropriate subitems of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part I (patient questionnaire) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale.Results: We found that lower dopamine D3 receptor availability measured with [11C]-PHNO PET was associated with greater severity of excessive daytime sleepiness but not with problems of falling asleep or insomnia.Conclusion: In our cohort of patients with PD, the occurrence of excessive daytime sleepiness was linked to reductions in hypothalamic dopamine D3 receptor availability. If these preliminary findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of patients with polysomnographic characterization, selective pharmacologic modulation of the dopaminergic D3 system could be used to increase daytime alertness in patients with PD.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Pagano G, Molloy S, Bain PG, Rabiner EA, Chaudhuri KR, Brooks DJ, Pavese N

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Neurology

Year: 2016

Volume: 87

Issue: 23

Pages: 2451-2456

Print publication date: 06/12/2016

Online publication date: 02/11/2016

Acceptance date: 06/09/2016

ISSN (print): 0028-3878

ISSN (electronic): 1526-632X

Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003396

DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003396


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