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Clustered randomised controlled trial of two education interventions designed to increase physical activity and well-being of secondary school students: the MOVE Project

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Ash Routen, Dr Katie Thomson

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Abstract

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of 2 interventions in improving the physical activity and well-being of secondary school children. Design: A clustered randomised controlled trial; classes, 1 per school, were assigned to 1 of 3 intervention arms or a control group based on a 2x2 factorial design. The interventions were peer-mentoring and participative learning. Year 7 children (aged 1112) in the peer-mentoring intervention were paired with year 9 children for 6 weekly mentoring meetings. Year 7 children in the participative learning arm took part in 6 weekly geography lessons using personalised physical activity and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. Year 7 children in the combined intervention received both interventions, with the year 9 children only participating in the mentoring sessions. Participants: 1494 year 7 students from 60 schools in the North of England took part in the trial. Of these, 43 students opted out of taking part in the evaluation measurements, 2 moved teaching group and 58 changed school. Valid accelerometry outcome data were collected for 892 students from 53 schools; and well-being outcome data were available for 927 students from 52 schools. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes were mean minutes of accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity per day, and well-being as evaluated by the KIDSCREEN-27 questionnaire. These data were collected 6 weeks after the intervention; a 12-month follow-up is planned. Results: No significant effects (main or interaction) were observed for the outcomes. However, small positive differences were found for both outcomes for the participative learning intervention. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the 2 school-based interventions did not modify levels of physical activity or well-being within the period monitored. Change in physical activity may require more comprehensive individual behavioural intervention, and/or more system-based efforts to address wider environmental influences such as family, peers, physical environment, transport and educational policy.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Tymms PB, Curtis SE, Routen AC, Thomson KH, Bolden DS, Bock S, Dunn CE, Cooper AR, Elliott JG, Moore HJ, Summerbell CD, Tiffin PA, Kasim AS

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: BMJ Open

Year: 2016

Volume: 6

Issue: 1

Print publication date: 01/01/2016

Online publication date: 06/01/2016

Acceptance date: 30/11/2015

ISSN (electronic): 2044-6055

Publisher: BMJ Group

URL: http://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009318

DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009318


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