Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

General lifetime damage model for glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GRE) composite pipes under multiaxial loading

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Geoffrey Gibson

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

This paper presents the modelling of a general lifetime performance for glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GRE) composite pipes similar to the well-known Tsai-Hill interactive failure criterion. Tsai Hill criterion is based on the Von Misses distortional energy criterion which was modified to satisfy the orthotropic nature of GRE composite pipes. The effects of stress developed in each ply from ultimate elastic wall stress (UEWS) test were expressed in a single quadratic term of axial and hoop stress through laminate theory. The term then solved to produce limits with respect to axial and hoop stress, which represented in a graphical form of failure envelope. The modelled envelop shows a good agreement with experimental data from the multiaxial UEWS test of ±55° GRE composite pipes. This indicates that such model can be used to predict the long-term performance of GRE pipes under combine loadings. Copyright © 2014 Trans Tech Publications Ltd, Switzerland.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Majid MSA, Afendi M, Daud R, Amin NAM, Mohamad A, Cheng EM, Gibson AG, Hekman M

Publication type: Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)

Publication status: Published

Conference Name: International Conference on Advanced Materials Engineering and Technology (ICAMET 2013)

Year of Conference: 2014

Pages: 624-628

Online publication date: 01/12/2013

Acceptance date: 01/01/1900

ISSN: 1013-9826

Publisher: Scientific.Net

URL: https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.594-595.624

DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/KEM.594-595.624

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

Series Title: Key Engineering Materials

ISBN: 9783037859377


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share