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Analyzing the Metagenome of Smear Cheese Flora Using Next Generation Sequencing Tools

Lookup NU author(s): Nagamani Bora, Emeritus Professor Alan Ward

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Abstract

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.Next or new generation sequencing (NGS) has driven down the cost of sequencing to make genomics, metagenomics, transcriptomics and metatranscriptomics feasible across many fields. The technology continues to evolve and currently low cost and high throughput are offset by short read lengths and complex multiplexing. The current state of the technology is described here. Genomics was a mature field before the widespread introduction of NGS but metagenomics has evolved with it. The field of metagenomics is described, and links directly to many of the classical techniques applied to cheese which have also tried to understand and optimize the process by understanding the organisms present, and examples of the results from cheese-based studies are given. With genomic data for cheese-related organisms it is possible to begin to comprehensively understand what they can potentially do, but next generation metatranscriptomics can directly address function. The potential to address directly not just who is there but also what they are doing using metatranscriptomics is also addressed which opens the field to systems and synthetic biology approaches.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Bora N, Ward AC

Publication type: Book Chapter

Publication status: Published

Book Title: Diversity, Dynamics and Functional Role of Actinomycetes on European Smear Ripened Cheeses

Year: 2015

Pages: 137-153

Online publication date: 30/09/2014

Acceptance date: 01/01/1900

Publisher: Springer International Publishing

URL: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-10464-5_5

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-10464-5_5

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 9783319104645


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