Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Low-complexity power control and energy harvesting algorithms for wiretap channels employing finite-alphabet input schemes

Lookup NU author(s): Weichen Xiang, Dr Martin Johnston, Dr Stephane Le Goff

Downloads


Licence

This is the authors' accepted manuscript of an article that has been published in its final definitive form by IEEE, 2018.

For re-use rights please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.


Abstract

IEEE We discuss the design rules of an energy-efficient wireless wiretap channel in this paper. On the transmitter side, we investigate the optimal power control policy for secrecy rate maximization over wiretap channels with the bit-interleaved coded modulation (BICM) scheme. On the receiver side, an energy harvesting (EH) algorithm is used to collect wireless signal energy without degrading the secrecy rate performance. These objectives are challenging as the closed-form solution to the mutual information of finite-alphabet input schemes remains unknown. In this paper, we derive a closed-form relationship between the secrecy rate and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by transforming the SNR from the linear domain to the logarithm domain. The optimal power control policy (PCP) can be easily obtained by exhaustive search in a small interval, whereas the traditional search is performed over the entire SNR range. We also propose a sub-optimal PCP algorithm that significantly reduces the search complexity with only a minor performance loss. The optimal power splitting ratio (PSR) is studied to save energy while achieving the target secrecy rate. We show that if the transmission power is too high, the receiver is unable to simultaneously harvest energy from the wireless signals and achieve the target secrecy rate.erval, whereas the traditional search is performed over the entire SNR range. We also propose a sub-optimal PCP algorithm that significantly reduces the search complexity with only a minor performance loss. The optimal power splitting ratio (PSR) is studied to save energy while achieving the target secrecy rate. We show that if the transmission power is too high, the receiver is unable to simultaneously harvest energy from the wireless signals and achieve the target secrecy rate.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Xiang W, Johnston M, Le Goff S

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security

Year: 2018

Volume: 13

Issue: 2

Pages: 318-326

Print publication date: 01/02/2018

Online publication date: 04/09/2017

Acceptance date: 02/04/2016

Date deposited: 16/10/2017

ISSN (print): 1556-6013

ISSN (electronic): 1556-6021

Publisher: IEEE

URL: https://doi.org/10.1109/TIFS.2017.2749161

DOI: 10.1109/TIFS.2017.2749161


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share