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An Investigation on Ship Operability versus Equipment Operability in Irregular Waves

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Ali Bakhshandehrostami

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

A ship may have a certain function for which a set of appropriate equipment must perform their right functionalities. A ship is a total system composed of several subsystems. From a particular point of view, a naval ship as a total system may be divided into two subsystems such as the arms subsystem (guns, missiles, rockets and torpedoes) and the ship subsystem (includes everything except arms). The main goal of this study is to fi nd out which subsystem of a ship fails to perform its functionality in harsh conditions of sea waves. For this purpose, a linear mathematical model for ship motions and dynamic behaviour such as accelerations, deck wetness, propeller emergence and so on is prepared. For the arms dynamics on the deck of the ship, a model based on motion of the ship as a solid object is considered. The criteria of the operability of the ship subsystem and the arms subsystem are collected from references and rearranged. A computer program is developed based on the mathematical model and the seakeeping criteria in irregular waves. A case study has been done for an existing frigate with a gun and a particular type of torpedo. Comparison of the range of operability of the arms subsystem and the ship subsystem shows that the gun has less operability than the ship.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Zeraatgar H, Bakhshandehrostami A

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Brodogradnja

Year: 2012

Volume: 63

Issue: 1

Pages: 30-34

Online publication date: 31/03/2013

Date deposited: 12/07/2018

ISSN (print): 1845-5859

ISSN (electronic): 0007-215X

Publisher: Brodarski institut doo

URL: https://hrcak.srce.hr/78919


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