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A Propaganda Model for the twenty-first Century: Structure-Agency Dynamics and the Intersection of Class, Gender and Race

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Florian Zollmann

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Abstract

The following chapter provides a reassessment of the Herman-Chomsky propaganda model (henceforth PM). Scholars using the PM have largely focused on elite news media reporting of war, foreign policy and conflict using a structuralist lens based on the political-economy tradition. Furthermore, much of the research on the PM has relied on broadcast-era concepts and theoretical understandings. To rectify some of its shortfalls, this chapter aims to revise and expand the PM in the light of the 21st century media environment. The chapter will review and synthesize research from various fields of studies to demonstrate the continued relevance of the PM’s main variables. Additionally, I will argue that filtering processes not only relate to corporate-market constraints but also to factors such as technology, agency, gender and race. The chapter will provide a timely update of the PM. Whilst some scholars have argued that we are currently entering an era of fragmented media, my analysis suggests that the PM is more relevant today than ever before.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Zollmann F

Editor(s): MacLeod, A

Publication type: Book Chapter

Publication status: Published

Book Title: Propaganda in the Information Age: Still Manufacturing Consent

Year: 2019

Pages: 23-44

Print publication date: 09/05/2019

Online publication date: 24/04/2019

Acceptance date: 19/10/2018

Publisher: Routledge

Place Published: Abingdon

URL: https://www.routledge.com/Propaganda-in-the-Information-Age-Still-Manufacturing-Consent-1st-Edition/MacLeod/p/book/9781138366404

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 9781138366398


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