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Substrate oxidation and the influence of breakfast in normobaric hypoxia and normoxia

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Oliver Shannon

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).


Abstract

© 2019, The Author(s).Purpose: Previous research has reported inconsistent effects of hypoxia on substrate oxidation, which may be due to differences in methodological design, such as pre-exercise nutritional status and exercise intensity. This study investigated the effect of breakfast consumption on substrate oxidation at varying exercise intensities in normobaric hypoxia compared with normoxia. Methods: Twelve participants rested and exercised once after breakfast consumption and once after omission in normobaric hypoxia (4300 m: FiO2 ~ 11.7%) and normoxia. Exercise consisted of walking for 20 min at 40%, 50% and 60% of altitude-specific V ˙ O2max at 10–15% gradient with a 10 kg backpack. Indirect calorimetry was used to calculate carbohydrate and fat oxidation. Results: The relative contribution of carbohydrate oxidation to energy expenditure was significantly reduced in hypoxia compared with normoxia during exercise after breakfast omission at 40% (22.4 ± 17.5% vs. 38.5 ± 15.5%, p = 0.03) and 60% V ˙ O2max (35.4 ± 12.4 vs. 50.1 ± 17.6%, p = 0.03), with a trend observed at 50% V ˙ O2max (23.6 ± 17.9% vs. 38.1 ± 17.0%, p = 0.07). The relative contribution of carbohydrate oxidation to energy expenditure was not significantly different in hypoxia compared with normoxia during exercise after breakfast consumption at 40% (42.4 ± 15.7% vs. 48.5 ± 13.3%, p = 0.99), 50% (43.1 ± 11.7% vs. 47.1 ± 14.0%, p = 0.99) and 60% V ˙ O2max (54.6 ± 17.8% vs. 55.1 ± 15.0%, p = 0.99). Conclusions: Relative carbohydrate oxidation was significantly reduced in hypoxia compared with normoxia during exercise after breakfast omission but not during exercise after breakfast consumption. This response remained consistent with increasing exercise intensities. These findings may explain some of the disparity in the literature.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Griffiths A, Deighton K, Shannon OM, Matu J, King R, O'Hara JP

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: European Journal of Applied Physiology

Year: 2019

Volume: 119

Pages: 1909–1920

Print publication date: 01/09/2019

Online publication date: 03/07/2019

Acceptance date: 17/06/2019

Date deposited: 05/08/2019

ISSN (print): 1439-6319

ISSN (electronic): 1439-6327

Publisher: Springer Verlag

URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-019-04179-6

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-019-04179-6


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