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An empirical formulation to predict maximum deflection of blast wall under explosion

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Do Kyun Kim

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Abstract

This study proposes an empirical formulation to predict the maximum deformation of offshore blast wall structure that is subjected to impact loading caused by hydrocarbon explosion. The blast wall model is assumed to be supported by a simply-supported boundary condition and corrugated panel is modelled. In total, 1,620 cases of LS-DYNA simulations were conducted to predict the maximum deformation of blast wall, and they were then used as input data for the development of the empirical formulation by regression analysis. Stainless steel was employed as materials and the strain rate effect was also taken into account. For the development of empirical formulation, a wide range of parametric studies were conducted by considering the main design parameters for corrugated panel, such as geometric properties (corrugation angle, breadth, height and thickness) and load profiles (peak pressure and time). In the case of the blast profile, idealised triangular shape is assumed. It is expected that the obtained empirical formulation will be useful for structural designers to predict maximum deformation of blast wall installed in offshore topside structures in the early design stage.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Kim DK, Ng WCK, Hwang OJ

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Structural Engineering and Mechanics

Year: 2018

Volume: 68

Issue: 2

Pages: 237-245

Print publication date: 25/10/2018

Online publication date: 25/10/2018

Acceptance date: 08/09/2018

ISSN (print): 1225-4568

ISSN (electronic): 1598-6217

Publisher: Techno Press

URL: https://doi.org/10.12989/sem.2018.68.2.237

DOI: 10.12989/sem.2018.68.2.237


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