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Impaired Perfusion And Capillary Dysfunction In Prodromal Alzhemer’s Disease

Lookup NU author(s): Rokiah Ismail, Professor David Brooks

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC 4.0).


Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Ischemic cardiovascular disease increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). There is also growing evidence of an association between cerebrovascular pathology and the pathology of AD. Capillary dysfunction (CD), a condition in which capillary flow disturbances rather than arterial blood supply limit brain oxygen extraction, could represent an overlooked vascular contributor to neurodegeneration. We examined whether cortical capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH), an index of CD, is elevated in amyloid-positive patients with mild cognitive impairment (prodromal AD). METHODS: We performed structural and perfusion weighted MRI in 22 prodromal AD (pAD) patients and 21 healthy controls. RESULTS: We found hypoperfusion, reduced blood volume, and elevated CTH in the parietal and frontal cortices of pAD patients[DB1] compared to controls while only the precuneus showed focal cortical atrophy. DISCUSSION: We propose that prodromal AD is associated with microvascular flow disturbances that occur ahead of cortical atrophy and potentially act to limit local tissue oxygenation contributing to the development of neurodegeneration.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Nielsen RB, Parbo P, Ismail R, Dalby R, Tietze A, Brændgaard H, Gottrup H, Brooks DJ, Østergaard L, Eskildsen SF

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring

Year: 2020

Volume: 12

Issue: 1

Online publication date: 21/05/2020

Acceptance date: 24/02/2020

Date deposited: 25/02/2020

ISSN (electronic): 2352-8729

Publisher: Wiley

URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/dad2.12032

DOI: 10.1002/dad2.12032


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