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Understanding Suicide Risk in Autistic Adults: Comparing the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide in Autistic and Non-autistic Samples

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Jacqueline Rodgers

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Abstract

© 2020, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.This study explored whether the Interpersonal Theory of suicide informs our understanding of high rates of suicidality in autistic adults. Autistic and non-autistic adults (n = 695, mean age 41.7 years, 58% female) completed an online survey of self-reported thwarted belonging, perceived burden, autistic traits, suicidal capability, trauma, and lifetime suicidality. Autistic people reported stronger feelings of perceived burden, thwarted belonging and more lifetime trauma than non-autistic people. The hypothesised interaction between burdensomeness and thwarted belonging were observed in the non-autistic group but not in the autistic group. In both groups autistic traits influenced suicidality through burdensomeness/thwarted belonging. Promoting self-worth and social inclusion are important for suicide prevention and future research should explore how these are experienced and expressed by autistic people.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Pelton MK, Crawford H, Robertson AE, Rodgers J, Baron-Cohen S, Cassidy S

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Year: 2020

Pages: Epub ahead of print

Online publication date: 03/03/2020

Acceptance date: 02/04/2018

ISSN (print): 0162-3257

ISSN (electronic): 1573-3432

Publisher: Springer

URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04393-8

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-020-04393-8

PubMed id: 32125567


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