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An electromagnetic imaging system for remote sign language communication

Lookup NU author(s): Sanja Dogramadzi, Dr Charles Allen, Professor Duncan Bell

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Abstract

The technique described in this paper is concerned with the provision of a sign language emulator driven by an array of electromagnetic sensors integrated into a pair of data gloves. The objective is to provide a 3D visualization of the signing performed either end of the telephone link. The link requires an ISDN telephone protocol which is now actively marketed in the UK by the telecommunications industry. The objective of the work is to enable the deaf to communicate across telecommunications links. The sensing system is based on an electromagnetic imaging technique devised for key hole surgery and specifically for guidance of colonoscopes during colonoscopy in the screening and treatment of intestinal cancers. It comprises modules for generating magnetic field, sensing the magnetic field and processing the signals from the first two modules. Sensors are mounted in a pair of gloves and determine a position of the fingers and hands to enable the sign language to be read by a computer. Images could be than transferred via ISDN links anywhere in the world. This system operates in the real time and with a position accuracy of a few millimeter and orientation accuracy of less than 1 degree of arc.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Dogramadzi S, Allen CR, Bell GD, Rowland R

Publication type: Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)

Publication status: Published

Conference Name: Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference, 1999. IMTC/99. Proceedings of the 16th IEEE

Year of Conference: 1999

Number of Volumes: 3

Pages: 1443-1446

ISSN: 1091-5281

Publisher: IEEE

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IMTC.1999.776047

DOI: 10.1109/IMTC.1999.776047

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 0780352769


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