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The effect of ozone fumigation and different Brassica rapa lines on the feeding behaviour of Pieris brassicae larvae

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Jerry Barnes, Dr Gordon Port

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Abstract

Elevated levels of tropospheric ozone and their effects on plants have been studied for a great number of years. Ozone is a gaseous pollutant and acts as a phytotoxin. Even though ozone is known to change the physiology of plants, little attention has been given to the indirect effects of ozone on plant-insect interactions. This paper addresses this question by investigating the interactive effects of ozone and plant genotype on insects. Lines of rapid-cycling Brassica rapa (L.) selected for their contrasting sensitivity to ozone and Pieris brassicae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) were used as a model system. The effect of differences in ozone sensitivity and ozone fumigation on the plant's carbon and nitrogen pools, the feeding preference, and behaviour of P. brassicae larvae were investigated. The results show that the plant's susceptibility to ozone interacts in a complex way with ozone induced alterations in the suitability of the plant for the insect. Only the larval performance on the sensitive line was affected by ozone exposure. Biochemical changes in the resistant B. rapa line made the plant a better food source for the insects, since the digestibility of this plant was significantly higher than that of the sensitive line, and the larvae pupated more quickly and were heavier.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Jondrup PM, Barnes JD, Port GR

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata

Year: 2002

Volume: 104

Issue: 1

Pages: 143-151

ISSN (print): 0013-8703

ISSN (electronic): 1570-7458

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1021288520135

DOI: 10.1023/A:1021288520135


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