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Public preferences for informed choice under conditions of risk uncertainty

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Lynn Frewer, Dr Mary Brennan, Dr Sharron Kuznesof, Dr Mitchell Ness

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Abstract

It has been assumed that the general public is unable to conceptualize information about risk uncertainties, and so communication about food risk has tended to avoid this type of information. However, recent societal and political pressure to increase transparency in risk management practices will result in the uncertainties inherent in risk analysis becoming subject to public scrutiny. Best practice regarding risk communication must address how to communicate risk uncertainty. A questionnaire was developed that aimed to assess how the general public characterized uncertainty associated with food risks. The results indicated that people wanted to be provided with information about food risk uncertainty as soon as the uncertainty was identified. People were more accepting of uncertainty associated with the scientific process of risk management than they were of uncertainty due to lack of action or lack of interest on the part of the government. The findings indicate that the focus of risk communication should be on "what is being done to reduce the uncertainty." Recommendations are made regarding best practice for communicating risk uncertainty.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Kuznesof S; Brennan M; Ness M; Frewer LJ; Miles S; Ritson C

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Public Understanding of Science

Year: 2002

Volume: 11

Issue: 4

Pages: 363-372

Print publication date: 01/01/2002

ISSN (print): 0963-6625

ISSN (electronic): 1361-6609

Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0963-6625/11/4/304

DOI: 10.1088/0963-6625/11/4/304


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