Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Neuronal metabolism governs cortical network response state

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Mark Cunningham, Dr Claudia Racca, Professor Miles Whittington

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

The level of arousal in mammals is correlated with metabolic state and specific patterns of cortical neuronal responsivity. In particular, rhythmic transitions between periods of high activity (up phases) and low activity (down phases) vary between wakefulness and deep sleep/anesthesia. Current opinion about changes in cortical response state between sleep and wakefulness is split between neuronal network-mediated mechanisms and neuronal metabolism-related mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that slow oscillations in network state are a consequence of interactions between both mechanisms. Specifically, recurrent networks of excitatory neurons, whose membrane potential is partly governed by ATP-modulated potassium (KATP) channels, mediate response-state oscillations via the interaction between excitatory network activity involving slow, kainate receptor-mediated events and the resulting activation of ATP-dependent homeostatic mechanisms. These findings suggest that KATP channels function as an interface between neuronal metabolic state and network responsivity in mammalian cortex. © 2006 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Cunningham MO, Pervouchine DD, Racca C, Kopell NJ, Davies CH, Jones RSG, Traub RD, Whittington MA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Year: 2006

Volume: 103

Issue: 14

Pages: 5597-5601

ISSN (print): 0027-8424

ISSN (electronic): 1091-6490

Publisher: National Academy of Sciences

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0600604103

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0600604103

PubMed id: 16565217


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share