Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

What makes acquired foreign accent syndrome foreign?

Lookup NU author(s): Emeritus Professor Nick Miller

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

EJC, strongly right handed, presented with acquired neurogenic foreign accent syndrome (FAS) after a right anterior communicating artery aneurysm haemorrhage. We describe perceived and spectrographically viewed changes to her speech and attempt to ascertain why EJC was perceived as foreign, stepping beyond the general path of assuming observed changes automatically explain the perceived foreignness. EJC's speech is compared with local English and foreign accent speakers; correlational and regression statistics are employed to explore which changes in EJC's speech most strongly associate with perceived foreignness. Vowel, consonant cluster and stress pattern changes emerge as significantly salient. It is argued that listener perception plays as important a role in FAS as the underlying speech disturbance. In EJC's case we conclude that she presents with a right hemisphere-based apraxic-ataxic speech disorder. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Miller N, Lowit A, O'Sullivan H

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Neurolinguistics

Year: 2006

Volume: 19

Issue: 5

Pages: 385-409

ISSN (print): 0911-6044

ISSN (electronic): 1873-8052

Publisher: Pergamon

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroling.2006.03.005

DOI: 10.1016/j.jneuroling.2006.03.005


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share