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High-Frequency Network Oscillations in Cerebellar Cortex

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Steven Middleton, Dr Claudia Racca, Professor Mark Cunningham, Professor Thomas Knopfel, Dr Ian Schofield, Dr Alistair Jenkins, Professor Miles Whittington

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Abstract

Both cerebellum and neocortex receive input from the somatosensory system. Interaction between these regions has been proposed to underpin the correct selection and execution of motor commands, but it is not clear how such interactions occur. In neocortex, inputs give rise to population rhythms, providing a spatiotemporal coding strategy for inputs and consequent outputs. Here, we show that similar patterns of rhythm generation occur in cerebellum during nicotinic receptor subtype activation. Both gamma oscillations (30-80 Hz) and very fast oscillations (VFOs, 80-160 Hz) were generated by intrinsic cerebellar cortical circuitry in the absence of functional glutamatergic connections. As in neocortex, gamma rhythms were dependent on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition, whereas VFOs required only nonsynaptically connected intercellular networks. The ability of cerebellar cortex to generate population rhythms within the same frequency bands as neocortex suggests that they act as a common spatiotemporal code within which corticocerebellar dialog may occur. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Middleton SJ, Racca C, Cunningham MO, Traub RD, Monyer H, Knopfel T, Schofield IS, Jenkins A, Whittington MA

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Neuron

Year: 2008

Volume: 58

Issue: 5

Pages: 763-774

ISSN (print): 0896-6273

ISSN (electronic): 1097-4199

Publisher: Cell Press

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2008.03.030

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2008.03.030

PubMed id: 18549787


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