Toggle Main Menu Toggle Search

Open Access padlockePrints

Genetic and phenotypic evidence for Streptomyces griseus ecovars isolated from a beach and dune sand system

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Sanjay Babu, Dr James Stach, Emeritus Professor Michael Goodfellow

Downloads

Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available.


Abstract

This study was designed to determine the biogeography of six alkaliphilic Streptomyces strains which had been isolated from four locations within a 60m transect across a beach and dune sand system. The six strains shared >99% 16S rRNA gene similarities with one another and with representative strains of Streptomyces griseus. Infraspecific diversity amongst the strains was investigated by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in combination with carbon utilisation phenotypic testing. The results show that each of the strains is genotypically and phenotypically distinct. Furthermore, the MLST and carbon utilisation profiles were congruent thereby providing preliminary evidence which suggests that the observed infraspecific diversity is consistent with ecological selection. The results also demonstrate that infraspecific diversity can be observed over small spatial scales. These findings support the hypothesis that the six isolates are ecovars of Streptomyces griseus. The implications of these findings for prokaryotic biogeography and bioprospecting are discussed. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Antony-Babu S, Stach JEM, Goodfellow M

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology

Year: 2008

Volume: 94

Issue: 1

Pages: 63-74

Print publication date: 01/06/2008

ISSN (print): 0003-6072

ISSN (electronic): 1572-9699

Publisher: Springer Netherlands

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10482-008-9246-y

DOI: 10.1007/s10482-008-9246-y


Altmetrics

Altmetrics provided by Altmetric


Actions

Find at Newcastle University icon    Link to this publication


Share