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High temperature failure envelopes for thermosetting composite pipes in water

Lookup NU author(s): Dr Jack Hale, Professor Brian Shaw, Dr Stephen Speake, Professor Geoff Gibson

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Abstract

This paper presents the results of an investigation of the biaxial stress-strain behaviour of filament wound glass fibre reinforced composite pipes exposed to high temperature water. Two matrix systems were investigated: cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin; and siloxane modified phenolic alloy. Water absorption tests on pipe using the two systems at 95 degreesC showed equilibrium moisture contents of 0.5 and 4.5%, respectively, saturation being achieved within seven days at this temperature in both cases. The axial moduli of the pipes were determined at temperatures up to 160 degreesC, using a bending test. Reductions were observed in the Tg of both systems in the water saturated condition. Biaxial loading tests were carried out on the two pipe systems at temperatures from 20 to 160 degrees. The results are presented in the form of failure envelopes and stress-strain relationships under load. At the highest temperatures (above its Tg), significant weakening of the epoxy system was observed, especially in matrix dominated loading conditions. In contrast, the failure envelopes for the phenolic system showed remarkably little temperature influence.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Hale JM; Shaw BA; Speake SD; Gibson AG

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Plastics, Rubber and Composites

Year: 2000

Volume: 29

Issue: 10

Pages: 539-548

ISSN (print): 1465-8011

ISSN (electronic): 1743-2898

Publisher: Maney Publishing

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/maney/prc/2000/00000029/00000010/art00005

DOI: 10.1179/146580100101540752


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