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Factors influencing the development of wound infection following free-flap reconstruction for intra-oral cancer

Lookup NU author(s): David Cloke, Dr Almas Khan, Peter Hodgkinson, Neil McLean

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Abstract

Wound infection following tissue transfer in head and neck oncology is common. Factors known to be associated with infective complications include blood transfusion, pre-operative radiotherapy, duration of surgery, duration of preoperative stay and a history of smoking. The present study specifically examined 100 consecutive patients on a standard antibiotic protocol undergoing free flap reconstruction following resection of cancers of the oral cavity or oropharynx. Despite prophylactic antibiotics, 21 patients developed a head and neck wound infection. No statistically significant association was found between infective wound complications and a history of smoking, pre-operative radiotherapy or chemotherapy, Length of pre-operative hospital stay, duration of surgery, or number of units of blood transfused. We conclude that, in this group of patients, wound infection is a common and difficult problem, but with no statistically significant association with any of the variables studied. (C) 2004 The British Association of Plastic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. ALL rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Cloke DJ, Green JE, Khan AL, Hodgkinson PD, McLean NR

Publication type: Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)

Publication status: Published

Conference Name: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: 102nd Annual Meeting of the Medical Library Association

Year of Conference: 2004

Pages: 556-560

ISSN: 1748-6815

Publisher: Churchill Livingstone

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2004.04.006

DOI: 10.1016/j.bjps.2004.04.006

Library holdings: Search Newcastle University Library for this item

ISBN: 15321959


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