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Towards defining the neuropathological substrates of vascular dementia

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Raj Kalaria, Professor Rose Anne Kenny, Dr Clive Ballard, Emeritus Professor Robert Perry, Dr Tuomo Polvikoski

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Abstract

Cerebrovascular disease is highly heterogeneous but can culminate in vascular cognitive impairment or vascular dementia (VaD). As much as the clinical diagnosis warrants scrutiny, the neuropathological substrates of VaD also need to be better defined. Atherosclerosis and small vessel disease are the main causes of brain infarction. Lacunar infarcts or multiple microinfarcts in the basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem and white matter are associated with more than half of VaD cases consistent with subcortical ischaemic VaD. White matter changes including regions of incomplete infarction are usually widespread in VaD, but their contribution to impairment is not explicit. Other pathologies including hippocampal injury and Alzheimer type of lesions may also modify the course of dementia. Similar to other common dementias consensus criteria for VaD need unambiguous definition to impact on preventative and treatment strategies and are critical for selective recruitment to clinical trials. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Kalaria RN, Kenny RA, Ballard CG, Perry R, Ince P, Polvikoski T

Publication type: Conference Proceedings (inc. Abstract)

Publication status: Published

Conference Name: 1st Congress of the International Society for Vascular Behavioural and Cognitive Disorders (VAS-COG 2003)

Year of Conference: 2004

Pages: 75-80

ISSN: 0022-510X

Publisher: Journal of the Neurological Sciences: Elsevier

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2004.09.019

DOI: 10.1016/j.jns.2004.09.019

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