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Blood pressure in head-injured patients

Lookup NU author(s): Patrick Mitchell, Dr Barbara Gregson, Professor Alexander Mendelow, Dr Iain Chambers

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head-injured patients. Methods: The BrainIT group has collected high time-resolution physiological and clinical data from head-injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described. Results: The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ICP for ICP > 55 mm Hg. Conclusions: Patients with head injury appear to have a near normal distribution of blood pressure readings that are skewed towards higher values. The relationship between BP and ICP may be triphasic.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Mitchell P, Gregson BA, Piper I, Citerio G, Mendelow AD, Chambers IR, BrainIT Grp

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

Year: 2007

Volume: 78

Issue: 4

Pages: 399-402

ISSN (print): 0022-3050

ISSN (electronic): 1468-330X

Publisher: BMJ Group

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2006.100172

DOI: 10.1136/jnnp.2006.100172


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