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The use of a spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis device in the real-time diagnosis of melanoma in the setting of a melanoma screening clinic

Lookup NU author(s): Professor Muzlifah Haniffa, Dr James Lloyd, Dr Clifford Lawrence

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Abstract

Background Skin imaging devices to aid melanoma diagnosis have been developed in recent years but few have been assessed clinically. Objectives To investigate if a spectrophotometric skin imaging device, the SIAscope, could increase a dermatologist's ability to distinguish melanoma from nonmelanoma in a melanoma screening clinic. Methods Eight hundred and eighty-one pigmented lesions from 860 patients were prospectively assessed clinically and with the aid of the spectrophotometric device by a dermatologist. Assessment before and after spectrophotometric imaging was made and compared with histology, where available, or with the clinical diagnosis of a dermatologist with 20 years of experience. Results One hundred and seventy-nine biopsies were performed, with 31 melanomas diagnosed. Sensitivity and specificity for melanoma diagnosis before and after spectrophotometry were 94% and 91% vs. 87% and 91%, respectively, with no significant difference in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (0.932 and 0.929). Conclusions Our study provides no evidence for the use of SIAscope by dermatologists to help distinguish melanoma from benign lesions.


Publication metadata

Author(s): Haniffa MA, Lloyd JJ, Lawrence CM

Publication type: Article

Publication status: Published

Journal: British Journal of Dermatology

Year: 2007

Volume: 156

Issue: 6

Pages: 1350-1352

ISSN (print): 0007-0963

ISSN (electronic): 1365-2133

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2007.07932.x

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2007.07932.x


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